Why Have You Forsaken Me?

Psalm 22 portrays the suffering Messiah experienced as God did not deliver Him from His enemies. His antagonists sneered while mocking Him, and they also inflicted bodily harm upon Messiah.  His heart melted within Him. These poignant descriptions personified the truth that God did not deliver Messiah from suffering and groaning, but ultimately Messiah would stand before God in the great assembly and praise God.  Indeed, the triumph of Messiah by the power of the LORD would be told to all generations. Again, nothing in Psalm 22 depicts a separation of Jesus and the Godhead, but rather shows that God separated His deliverance from the groaning cries for help by Messiah.  Even then, and although Messiah would die, Messiah would still triumphantly proclaim the righteousness of God. So also glory and proclamation of victory would follow the suffering of Jesus, whom God did not deliver even when Jesus groaned in pain upon the cross. God separated Jesus from deliverance, not from the eternal unity with the Godhead.  In summary, David described the separation Messiah felt between: (1) the LORD’S deliverance from suffering and death; and (2) His groaning cries for help. 1Any ontological separation in the Godhead must be read into Psalm 22, because not a single verse describes the ontological separation attributed by some theologians to Matthew 27:46. Psalm 22:1, page 874, does not teach that the G odhead separated from Jesus, or that God turned away from Jesus at any time.  God forsook Messiah in the sense that God did not deliver Messiah from groaning and suffering. In the same sense, Jesus as God was never separated from God the Father or God the Holy Spirit. Any notion of ontological separation in the Godhead remains contrary to many truths of Scripture affirming the unity of God. 2Furthermore, God Himself suffered on the cross for us, as a result of the presence of the fully human nature in Christ and the fully divine nature of Christ, joined inseparably in one hypostatic union.

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1. Any ontological separation in the Godhead must be read into Psalm 22, because not a single verse describes the ontological separation attributed by some theologians to Matthew 27:46.
2. Furthermore, God Himself suffered on the cross for us, as a result of the presence of the fully human nature in Christ and the fully divine nature of Christ, joined inseparably in one hypostatic union.