Why Have You Forsaken Me?

 that “if it is possible, let this cup pass from me (Matthew 22:39, page 1551). Jesus pictured the removal of the cup of suffering, and prayed for it in agony, with His sweat becoming like great drops of blood, falling to the ground (Luke 22:44, page 1646). The groaning cries of Messiah parallel the fervent prayers of Jesus offered in agony. 1The term “agony” (“ἀγωνίᾳ”) reveals the internal struggle Jesus felt as He prayed.  Like Messiah in Psalm 22, Jesus experienced intense internal pressures as He prayed for help from God.  His sweat was becoming like drops of blood (“θρόμβοι αἵματος”). Jesus, in perfect concert with the Father’s will, drank the cup of wrath, so that God’s justice and condemnation of sin would be poured out on Jesus, and not believers.  Therefore, Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane revealed that Jesus sought deliverance from suffering with groaning prayers, but God forsook Jesus to suffering and shame on the cross. 

The Christological Controversies

The Christological controversies within the early church also help us avoid error concerning the person of Christ.  Particularly, Nestorius (c.386 A.D. – c. 451 A.D.) Archbishop of Constantinople, erroneously taught that God did not die on the cross.  Although Nestorious affirmed that Christ had two separate and distinct natures (one human and one divine), Nestorious also declared that the human nature in Christ could die, but the divine nature in Christ could not die. Cyril of Alexandria (c. 376 A.D. – 444 A.D.), Patriarch of Alexandria, opposed such views, and taught that Christ had both a human nature and divine nature, united in one hypostasis and one prosopon.   Cyril emphasized that God died on the cross in the Person of Jesus Christ.  The First Council of Ephesus (431 A.D.) condemned the

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1. The term “agony” (“ἀγωνίᾳ”) reveals the internal struggle Jesus felt as He prayed.  Like Messiah in Psalm 22, Jesus experienced intense internal pressures as He prayed for help from God.  His sweat was becoming like drops of blood (“θρόμβοι αἵματος”).