Why Have You Forsaken Me?

views of Nestorius.  Later, the Council of Chalcedon (451 A.D.) elaborated more fully a Christology of two natures, not commingled or confused, united in one hypostases and existing as one prosopon. 1The Council of Chalcedon issued the following statement: “We, then, following the holy Fathers, all with one consent, teach people to confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same perfect in Godhead and also perfect in manhood; truly God and truly man, of a reasonable [rational] soul and body; consubstantial [co-essential] with the Father according to the Godhead, and consubstantial with us according to the Manhood; in all things like unto us, without sin; begotten before all ages of the Father according to the Godhead, and in these latter days, for us and for our salvation, born of the Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, according to the Manhood; one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only begotten, to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably; (ἐν δύο φύσεσιν ἀσυγχύτως, ἀτρέπτως, ἀδιαιρέτως, ἀχωρίστως – in duabus naturis inconfuse, immutabiliter, indivise, inseparabiliter) the distinction of natures being by no means taken away by the union, but rather the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one Person (prosopon) and one Subsistence (hypostasis), not parted or divided into two persons, but one and the same Son, and only begotten God (μονογενῆ Θεὸν), the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ; as the prophets from the beginning [have declared] concerning Him, and the Lord Jesus Christ Himself has taught us, and the Creed of the holy Fathers has handed down to us.” Eearlychurchtexts.com. Therefore, although many theologians  throughout the centuries have doubted that God could die on the cross, the Bible clearly presents Jesus as laying down His life and taking it up again (John 10:17-18, pages 1675-1676). Some people argue that Habakkuk 1:13, page 1467, means that God cannot look upon sin and so God could not look upon Christ as He was laden with our sin. The argument then continues that God had to forsake Jesus when Jesus became sin for us on the cross (2 Corinthians 5:21, page 1809).  Such a view misses the fact that God in Christ died on the cross, and so God in Christ not only looked upon sin, but fully experienced sin and death.

Everyone who teaches that Psalm 22:1, page 874, means that  Jesus was cutoff from the Godhead as He made atonement for sins must carefully avoid the Nestorian heresy that God did not die in Christ. We read in Scripture that “God in Christ was reconciling the world to Himself” (2 Corinthians 5:19, page 1809).  The hypostatic union of the human and divine natures in Christ means that both the human nature  and the divine nature in Christ experienced death and sin. Christ died and death was master over Him for a time (Romans 6:9, page 1766).  Christ particularly died to sin once for all, “so that the life He now lives, He lives to God” (Romans 6:10, page 1766). The fact that Christ died to sin establishes the truth that every believer follows Christ in living a resurrected life in Christ to God.  The essence of salvation rests upon Christ dying for our sins with the resurrection of Christ and glory to follow (Luke 24:26, pages 1651-1652). 

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1. The Council of Chalcedon issued the following statement: “We, then, following the holy Fathers, all with one consent, teach people to confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same perfect in Godhead and also perfect in manhood; truly God and truly man, of a reasonable [rational] soul and body; consubstantial [co-essential] with the Father according to the Godhead, and consubstantial with us according to the Manhood; in all things like unto us, without sin; begotten before all ages of the Father according to the Godhead, and in these latter days, for us and for our salvation, born of the Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, according to the Manhood; one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only begotten, to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably; (ἐν δύο φύσεσιν ἀσυγχύτως, ἀτρέπτως, ἀδιαιρέτως, ἀχωρίστως – in duabus naturis inconfuse, immutabiliter, indivise, inseparabiliter) the distinction of natures being by no means taken away by the union, but rather the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one Person (prosopon) and one Subsistence (hypostasis), not parted or divided into two persons, but one and the same Son, and only begotten God (μονογενῆ Θεὸν), the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ; as the prophets from the beginning [have declared] concerning Him, and the Lord Jesus Christ Himself has taught us, and the Creed of the holy Fathers has handed down to us.” Eearlychurchtexts.com.