Why Have You Forsaken Me?

Psalm 22:11

Similarly, in Psalm 22:11, page 874, David again used the same basic term to urge God not to be “far away” (“תִּרְחַק”) from Messiah because trouble is near Him. 1Again, the idea in Psalm 22:1, page 875, focused upon deliverance and help, not ontological (I am not differentiating “ontic” and “ontological” in this article) separation in the Godhead. Messiah sought for God to deliver Him from His enemies by being near to Him.

Psalm 22:19

In Psalm 22:19, page 875, Messiah again plead that the LORD would not be “not far off,” but rather that He would be the help of Messiah, and hasten to Messiah. 2The Hebrew expression “not far off” (“אַל-תִּרְחָק”) reiterated the constant theme that Messiah counted upon help from God to endure suffering, even after Messiah was not delivered from suffering 

Summary

These verses describe the concept of the spiritual spatial distance between groanings for deliverance and the help provided by the LORD.  They reveal two aspects of God’s help.  In the first instance, as shown in Psalm 22:1, page 874, Messiah called for deliverance from suffering, so that He would not be subjected to suffering.  In the second instance, Messiah underwent intense suffering, and in the midst of that suffering, relied upon the LORD’S help to endure that suffering.  For everyone who believes that God cut off (in the sense of ontological unity or fellowship with the Father) Messiah during His suffering and death, they should seriously ponder, among many important aspects, how Messiah could endure such suffering spiritually without the full power of God at work in the God-Man. Even though Christ uttered the words of “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” after hanging on the cross for hours, we should keep in mind the pictures of Psalm 22, and the continued belief that God would help Him endure the suffering, even if the LORD did not prevent Messiah from suffering.  The timing of Matthew 27:46, page 1555, seems particularly important because it was the ninth hour, and Jesus immediately gave up the spirit after this prayer.  We see in the progression of Psalm 22 an initial call for deliverance, followed by intense suffering, continued appeals for help, and then praise and glory to follow after death.  We shall see all of these events unfold as we look briefly at the flow of Psalm 22, and how that flow helps us understand the confidence of Messiah in the LORD.

References │ Page Numbers Below Footnotes   [ + ]

1. Again, the idea in Psalm 22:1, page 875, focused upon deliverance and help, not ontological (I am not differentiating “ontic” and “ontological” in this article) separation in the Godhead. Messiah sought for God to deliver Him from His enemies by being near to Him.
2. The Hebrew expression “not far off” (“אַל-תִּרְחָק”) reiterated the constant theme that Messiah counted upon help from God to endure suffering, even after Messiah was not delivered from suffering