Forgive the Unrepentant?

 

Luke 17:1-4, Page 1634
“1.He said to His disciples, ‘It is inevitable that stumbling blocks come, but woe to him through whom they come!
2. It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were thrown into the sea, than that he would cause one of these little ones to stumble.
3. Be on your guard! If you brother sins, rebuke him; and if he repents, forgive him.
4. And if he sins against you seven times a day, and eturns to you seven times, saying,’I repent,’ forgive him.'”

      In Luke 17:1-4, Jesus taught His disciples about repentance and forgiveness. He described the enormous evil of causing little ones to stumble (Luke 17:1-2, page 1634). In this context, Jesus indicated that even a person making little ones stumble must be rebuked, and upon repentance, forgiven. 1In Luke 17:1-2, page 1634, Jesus began by saying it was inevitable that stumbling blocks would come, but woe to him through whom they come. Jesus meant that causing one of these little ones to stumble would bring woe upon the sinner. In fact, Jesus described the woe as more severe than having a millstone hung around your neck and you cast into the sea. Jesus meant that while stumbling blocks are a fact of life, Jesus does not tolerate them. As we will see, Jesus calls upon the brother to forgive the one who causes stumbling blocks to little ones when they repent, even if they repent seven times a day for sin so profound it brings the woe of God upon them. Jesus then turned to the problem of brothers sinning against brothers. When a brother sins against me, I must rebuke 2In Luke 17:3, page 1634, Jesus commanded us to rebuke our brother who sins. The word for “rebuke” (“ἐπιτίμησον”) means to confront sharply and to admonish. Notice the command. Jesus commanded us to rebuke the sinful. Jesus described the sin as “ἁμάρτῃ” which means to miss the mark, or wander the path or law of righteousness. In contrast, the word “trespass” (“παραπτώματι”) means a false step, resulting in unsure footing and describes general sin, a violation of a moral standard, or an offense against God; see Galatians 6:1ff. below. my brother. Jesus does not allow us to ignore the sinful behavior of my brother, and if he repents, 3The word “repents” (“μετανοήσῃ”) means literally to move to a different mind. It carries the idea of leaving the old, sinful mind behind and changing to a new mind. In this verse, Jesus posed a conditional sentence (third class), linking the concepts of rebuke, repent, and forgive. Jesus described a hypothetical situation to remind every believer to rebuke the sinful, look for repentance, and forgive the repentant sinner every time the sinner seeks forgiveness. This hypothetical should remind us that Jesus Himself forgives us more than seventy times seven. forgive him (Luke 17:3, page 1634). Jesus commanded me to forgive my brother when he seeks repentance as a result of the rebuke I delivered to him. Please keep two things in mind here. First, as we have seen above, my brother who sins will always go to heaven, because God has already forgiven a believer for all sins–even if they do not listen to my rebuke and repent. Salvation never rests upon daily repentance. Salvation rests upon saving repentance producing saving faith in the work of Jesus Christ on the cross and His 

References │ Page Numbers Below Footnotes   [ + ]

1. In Luke 17:1-2, page 1634, Jesus began by saying it was inevitable that stumbling blocks would come, but woe to him through whom they come. Jesus meant that causing one of these little ones to stumble would bring woe upon the sinner. In fact, Jesus described the woe as more severe than having a millstone hung around your neck and you cast into the sea. Jesus meant that while stumbling blocks are a fact of life, Jesus does not tolerate them. As we will see, Jesus calls upon the brother to forgive the one who causes stumbling blocks to little ones when they repent, even if they repent seven times a day for sin so profound it brings the woe of God upon them.
2. In Luke 17:3, page 1634, Jesus commanded us to rebuke our brother who sins. The word for “rebuke” (“ἐπιτίμησον”) means to confront sharply and to admonish. Notice the command. Jesus commanded us to rebuke the sinful. Jesus described the sin as “ἁμάρτῃ” which means to miss the mark, or wander the path or law of righteousness. In contrast, the word “trespass” (“παραπτώματι”) means a false step, resulting in unsure footing and describes general sin, a violation of a moral standard, or an offense against God; see Galatians 6:1ff. below.
3. The word “repents” (“μετανοήσῃ”) means literally to move to a different mind. It carries the idea of leaving the old, sinful mind behind and changing to a new mind. In this verse, Jesus posed a conditional sentence (third class), linking the concepts of rebuke, repent, and forgive. Jesus described a hypothetical situation to remind every believer to rebuke the sinful, look for repentance, and forgive the repentant sinner every time the sinner seeks forgiveness. This hypothetical should remind us that Jesus Himself forgives us more than seventy times seven.