Forgive the Unrepentant?

      Second, we must not think we are something for helping the transgressor, and so deceive ourselves when we are actually nothing (Galatians 6:3, page 1826).  If we puff up with pride and arrogance, we will be of no value in restoring the transgressor.  Puffed up remarks include words like: “I am the spiritual man here to relieve your transgressions.” Instead, we come along side the transgressor and seek to bear the burden with them, and never draw glory to ourselves. 

      Third, we must each examine 1In Galatians 6:4, page 1826, the Holy Spirit chose the word “examine” (“δοκιμαζέτω”) in reference to our own work. This term for “examine” means that we examine our works for purity, as in metals; it can also mean that we scrutinize our works to determine the true character and motivations underlying our works. our own work (Galatians 6:4, page 1826). I help to restore the transgressor by encouraging him to examine his own work. As a believer, we will always find something that God has done in our lives that we should boast about. This self examination also requires us to focus upon the positive and wonderful works that God has done in the transgressor’s life. I will not examine his work, but my own. I will not live in boasting about how great I am. That will achieve nothing when it comes to restoring my brother caught in transgression. It will only make it worse. Examination of our works leads to restoration and repentance, and also praise and worship to God for His work in all our lives, even if we transgress. During this process of restoration, we should never compare ourselves as spiritual to the transgressor who is sinful. Keep in mind the temptation that caused my brother to sin may also cause me to transgress.  A focus upon my own works (not emotions) will promote restoration. Let me highlight here a common problem. If you become consumed with wringing repentance from your sinful brother, then you have violated this examine your own works principle. When we become obsessed with our sinful brother’s transgression, we violate this command to look first and foremost to our own examination of our own works. Rebukes come only from the Word of God, and never from our own personal opinions. We promote proper application of the Word of God by examining our works in light of the Word of God (Psalm 119:11, page 975). God performs the rebuke of the arrogant and cursed (Psalm 119:21, page 975). He uses believers to encourage, confront and rebuke other believers, with a view toward winning the brother (Matthew 18:15, page 1533).

       Fourth, each one of us will bear his own load (Galatians 6:5, page 1826).  While the spiritual brother helps bear the burden, we must each accept full spiritual responsibility for bearing our load before God. Ultimately, we stand before God, and we must learn to bear the load He places upon us. This sense of personal responsibility ultimately leads us to the proper understanding and action of what it means to carry our own load. No one else can do that for us.

References │ Page Numbers Below Footnotes   [ + ]

1. In Galatians 6:4, page 1826, the Holy Spirit chose the word “examine” (“δοκιμαζέτω”) in reference to our own work. This term for “examine” means that we examine our works for purity, as in metals; it can also mean that we scrutinize our works to determine the true character and motivations underlying our works.