The Books of Life │ Expository Bible Studies │ Christ Assembly

 

Book of the Living–Summary

1. Every Birth. At the time of birth, God Himself apparently records in the Book of the Living every live birth on earth. 

2. God Himself Records and Removes.  God Himself wrote down every individual born under heaven into the Book of the Living.  We know this fact because every individual name of the people of Israel could be removed individually from the Book of the Living

3. Individual Sin.  One single sin can cause God to blot out that sinner’s name from the Book of the Living, but God decides which sin may cause a sinner’s name to be blotted out.

4. Not Every Sin.  God exercises perfect, loving judgment in the decision to blot out a name from the Book of the Living.  Not every sin requires that sinner’s  name to be removed from the Book of the Living, because Moses sinned, and his name was not blotted out in Exodus 32. 

5. Distinction.  The Book of the Living may be distinguished from other books because this Book of the Living has every name written in it, and only God records births and blots out names as a judgment for individual, not corporate, sin.

 

Book of Wanderings

King David received great revelations from God about his royal life and enjoyed a very close relationship with God. In Psalm 56:8, 1See page 1993 of the Study Bible. David disclosed that God has counted all of his “wanderings” on earth and they were recorded in a particular book. 2The Hebrew phrase “You have counted” (“סָפַרְתָּה-אָתָּה”) explains David’s confidence here. The total term “have counted” (“סָפַרְתָּה”–“qal perfect for “have taken account”) and the “you” (“אָתָּה”–may be emphatic here) combined with “are they not in your book” (“הֲלֹא, בְּסִפְרָתֶךָ”) implies that God knows the sum of his wanderings and has written them down before they occurred, because David took comfort from these thoughts, as he relied upon God for deliverance. Even so, he wept, and God placed the tears of David in God’s bottle. David knew Yahweh as a personal, loving God, concerned about all of his wanderings and tears. God knew all about them, and was always ready to help. Wherever David fled before Saul and later his own children in rebellion, David counted upon Yahweh for deliverance.

Psalm 56:8, Page 908

You have taken account of my wanderings; Put my tears in Your bottle. Are they not recorded in Your book?

Samuel the prophet anointed David king, because his predecessor, King Saul, rejected the word of the LORD and so Yahweh rejected Saul from being king over Israel. 3See 1 Samuel 15:26, page 462 of the Study Bible, and the entire story in that chapter. Shortly after God rejected King Saul, Samuel anointed the young shepherd boy David as king of Israel in a private ceremony at Bethlehem, the hometown of Jesse, the father of David. 4See 1 Samuel 16:12-13, pages 463-464 of the Study Bible. Later, King Saul watched young David kill Goliath the giant, the champion of the Philistines who taunted the armies of the living God. 5See 1 Samuel 17:31-58, pages 466-468 of the Study Bible. King Saul soon grew jealous of David after the people sang that Saul had killed his thousands, but David had killed his ten thousands. 6See 1 Samuel 18:7, page 468 of the Study Bible. King Saul eventually tried to kill David, but David’s wife Michal (King Saul’s daughter) helped him escape from King Saul. David fled to Gath, the hometown of Goliath. There, David pretended to be insane, because he feared Achish, the king of Gath. In Psalm 56:8, 7See pages 908-909 of the Study Bible David wrote about his time in Gath.  He felt oppressed and trampled upon by his enemies, but David trusted in God alone. David knew that God was for him. In this context, David wrote that God had taken account of all his wanderings, put his tears into God’s bottle, and recorded all his wanderings in God’s book. 8The Hebrew term for “wandering” (“נֹדִי”) means the wanderings, particularly the wanderings of an outcast or fugitive. God used this root word to describe the wanderings of Cain, after he killed Abel, and described a land of wanderings where Cain went (Genesis 4:12-16). God also knows all the “wanderings” of Israel through the wilderness (Deuteronomy 2:7, page 228). Therefore, this book, which I shall call the Book of Wanderings, contains all the wanderings of David during his lifetime on earth, and appears to have been written before David wandered. David apparently took comfort and courage that God has a complete record of his wanderings on earth, apparently giving David confidence that one day he would be king, because God had already anointed David for that purpose. 9See 1 Samuel 15:12-13, page 464 of the Study Bible. The Books of Life │ Expository Bible Studies │ Christ Assembly

References │ Page Numbers Below Footnotes   [ + ]

1. See page 1993 of the Study Bible.
2. The Hebrew phrase “You have counted” (“סָפַרְתָּה-אָתָּה”) explains David’s confidence here. The total term “have counted” (“סָפַרְתָּה”–“qal perfect for “have taken account”) and the “you” (“אָתָּה”–may be emphatic here) combined with “are they not in your book” (“הֲלֹא, בְּסִפְרָתֶךָ”) implies that God knows the sum of his wanderings and has written them down before they occurred, because David took comfort from these thoughts, as he relied upon God for deliverance.
3. See 1 Samuel 15:26, page 462 of the Study Bible, and the entire story in that chapter.
4. See 1 Samuel 16:12-13, pages 463-464 of the Study Bible.
5. See 1 Samuel 17:31-58, pages 466-468 of the Study Bible.
6. See 1 Samuel 18:7, page 468 of the Study Bible.
7. See pages 908-909 of the Study Bible
8. The Hebrew term for “wandering” (“נֹדִי”) means the wanderings, particularly the wanderings of an outcast or fugitive. God used this root word to describe the wanderings of Cain, after he killed Abel, and described a land of wanderings where Cain went (Genesis 4:12-16). God also knows all the “wanderings” of Israel through the wilderness (Deuteronomy 2:7, page 228).
9. See 1 Samuel 15:12-13, page 464 of the Study Bible.